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Molly McCully Brown at the Sunken Garden Poetry

June 20, 4:30 pm - 8:30 pm

Featuring Molly McCully Brown

with Margaret Gibson

Purchase a Season Pass


 Schedule

5 pm           Prelude Interview
6 pm           Margaret Gibson
6:30 pm     Music
7:15 pm     Molly McCully Brown
8 pm          Book Signing

Admission

  • $15 advance online purchase, $20 at the gate, ages 18 and under free.
  • Parking is always free.

Seating

Food

  • Food, wine and other beverages may also be purchased on site from gourmet food vendors.
  • Iron & Grain Co. will be located on the front lawn.
  • Culteavo in The Tea Room located on the east side of the Garden in the Stone Garage.
  • A bartender will be serving red and white wine in the Garden.
  • Festival attendees are welcome to bring their own picnic suppers.

 

Molly McCully Brown is the author of The Virginia State Colony For Epileptics and Feebleminded (Persea Books, 2017), which won the 2016 Lexi Rudnitsky First Book Prize. Raised in rural Virginia, she is a graduate of Bard College at Simon’s Rock, Stanford University, and the University of Mississippi, where she received her MFA in poetry.

Her poems and essays have appeared or are forthcoming in Gulf Coast, Ninth Letter, Pleiades, Kenyon Review, Image, Colorado Review, TriQuarterly Online, The Rumpus, Meridian, and elsewhere. She’s been the recipient of fellowships and scholarships from the Civitella Ranieri foundation, the Sewanee Writers’ Conference, and the University of Mississippi, where she was a John and Renée Grisham fellow. Beginning in September 2017, she is the inaugural Jeff Baskin Writers Fellow at The Oxford American magazine. She is at work on a collection of essays about disability, poetry, religion, and the American South that explores the relationship between the body and that intangible other we sometimes call the soul.

Margaret Gibson’s Broken Cup brings a breath-taking eloquence to what Gibson has called “traveling the Way of Alzheimer’s” with her poet-husband David McKain.  After his initial and tentative diagnosis she wrote no poems for two years, but then poetry returned, and writing became a lightning rod that grounded her and allowed for moving ahead and for transformation.  “Poetry,” Gibson has written, “is an animate form.  It breathes; it discovers and restores voice.  A poem is another way of being present.”

Also the author of a memoir about growing up in Richmond, Virginia, Gibson has lived for forty years in Preston, Connecticut, with her husband.  She has taught in many colleges and universities, at the undergraduate and graduate levels, most recently as Professor in Residence at the University of Connecticut from 1993-2006.

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